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11-20 of 48 Results from ReadWriteThink

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  1. Classroom Resources | Grades   9 – 12  |  Lesson Plan  |  Standard Lesson
    Building Vietnam War Scavenger Hunts through Web-Based Inquiry
    Students research the effects of the Vietnam war on a specific group of people who were involved. They then create Internet scavenger hunts to share with the class.
  2. Classroom Resources | Grades   9 – 12  |  Lesson Plan  |  Unit
    Copyright Infringement or Not? The Debate over Downloading Music
    This lesson takes advantage of students' interest in music and audio sharing. Students investigate multiple perspectives in the music downloading debate and develop a persuasive argument for a classroom debate.
  3. Classroom Resources | Grades   6 – 8  |  Lesson Plan  |  Standard Lesson
    Copyright Law: From Digital Reprints to Downloads
    Students investigate how and why copyright law has changed over time, and apply this information to recent copyright issues, creating persuasive arguments based on the perspective of a particular group.
  4. Classroom Resources | Grades   6 – 8  |  Lesson Plan  |  Standard Lesson
    Developing Citizenship Through Rhetorical Analysis
    Students analyze rhetorical strategies in online editorials, building knowledge of strategies and awareness of local and national issues. This lesson teaches students connections between subject, writer, and audience and how rhetorical strategies are used in everyday writing.
  5. Classroom Resources | Grades   6 – 8  |  Lesson Plan  |  Standard Lesson
    Digitally Explaining the Immigrant Experience
    The United States has become the chosen home for many around the world. From the first explorers to the newest arrivals, each immigrant had his/her own reasons for traveling to America to face new challenges in this country. In this lesson after researching about particular immigrants, students will compare and contrast the immigrant experience. Together with a partner, students will create digital stories to share the experiences of two immigrants to encourage an understanding of the immigrant experience.
  6. Classroom Resources | Grades   3 – 5  |  Lesson Plan  |  Standard Lesson
    Engaging Students in a Collaborative Exploration of the Gettysburg Address
    In small groups, students closely examine one sentence from the Gettysburg Address and create a multigenre project communicating what they have discovered about the meaning and significance of the text.
  7. Classroom Resources | Grades   11 – 12  |  Lesson Plan  |  Standard Lesson
    Examining the Legacy of the American Civil Rights Era
    As part of their study of Richard Wright's Black Boy, students research and reflect on the current black-white racial divide in America. By examining the work of literature in the context of contemporary events, students will deepen their understanding of the work and of what it means to be an American today.
  8. Classroom Resources | Grades   9 – 12  |  Lesson Plan  |  Standard Lesson
    Exploring Audience and Purpose with a Single Issue
    Students explore the concepts of audience and purpose by focusing on an issue that divided Americans in 1925, the debate of evolution versus creationism raised by the Scopes Monkey Trial.
  9. Classroom Resources | Grades   6 – 8  |  Lesson Plan  |  Standard Lesson
    Exploring Free Speech and Persuasion with Nothing But the Truth
    Students read Avi's Nothing But the Truth and examine the First Amendment and student rights, and then decide whether the rights of the novel's protagonist, Philip, are violated.
  10. Classroom Resources | Grades   9 – 12  |  Lesson Plan  |  Standard Lesson
    Exploring Irony in the Conclusion of All Quiet on the Western Front
    After reading All Quiet on the Western Front, students discuss the novel's ironic ending, then compose alternate titles and endings for the book, and design new book covers.

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