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1-6 of 6 Results from ReadWriteThink

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  1. Classroom Resources | Grades   3 – 12  |  Calendar Activity  |  April 27
    Coretta Scott King was born on this day in 1927.
    Students do a book report assignment based on a current or past winner of the Coretta Scott King Book Award.
  2. Classroom Resources | Grades   3 – 6  |  Calendar Activity  |  June 29
    David Wiesner's book June 29, 1999 showcases this day.
    Students explore the delightful illustrations in Wiesner's book and identify elements that make the emotions in the story obvious to someone reading the book.
  3. Classroom Resources | Grades   7 – 12  |  Calendar Activity  |  January 3
    John Ronald Reuel Tolkien was born on this day.
    Students compare the film versions of The Lord of the Rings and Tolkien's novels. Students then imagine how a scene in a current novel that they are reading would be filmed.
  4. Classroom Resources | Grades   9 – 12  |  Calendar Activity  |  November 30
    Jonathan Swift was born on this day in 1667.
    Students explore satire and parody in television and film, advertising, and journalism and create a display that highlights their findings.
  5. Classroom Resources | Grades   5 – 12  |  Calendar Activity  |  November 28
    Poet William Blake was born in 1757.
    As a class, students brainstorm abstract concepts and personify that concept through a drawing or story told about the character who personifies that concept.
  6. Classroom Resources | Grades   1 – 12  |  Calendar Activity  |  November 20
    Where the Sidewalk Ends by Shel Silverstein was published in 1974.
    Students are introduced to a Silverstein verse and asked for their impressions. They then draw that they imagine when they read one of his lines and then write a line or two to continue the passage.