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1-6 of 6 Results from ReadWriteThink

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  1. Classroom Resources | Grades   3 – 8  |  Calendar Activity  |  July 11
    Children's author Patricia Polacco was born in 1944.
    Students share family stories of their own by writing original poems and reviewing parts of speech using the Diamante Poems tool.
  2. Classroom Resources | Grades   7 – 12  |  Calendar Activity  |  April 4
    In 1928, Maya Angelou was born.
    After hearing Maya Angelou's poem, "On the Pulse of Morning," students infer information about the speaker and her feelings about America and reflect on how one's life and experiences can influence one's writing.
  3. Classroom Resources | Grades   7 – 12  |  Calendar Activity  |  January 29
    Poe's "The Raven" was published in 1845.
    As Poe's "The Raven" is read aloud, students note their reactions and discuss the changes or development of their first impressions as the poem continues.
  4. Classroom Resources | Grades   9 – 12  |  Calendar Activity  |  December 10
    Poet Emily Dickinson was born in 1830.
    Students discuss Dickinson's poem "This Is My Letter To The World" and use it to focus on how audience affects voice.
  5. Classroom Resources | Grades   7 – 12  |  Calendar Activity  |  April 13
    Seamus Heaney was born on this day in 1939.
    Students focus on the figurative language in Heaney's poem, "Digging," and discuss the speaker's attitude, and how metaphor, simile, and image contribute to the poem.
  6. Classroom Resources | Grades   1 – 12  |  Calendar Activity  |  November 20
    Where the Sidewalk Ends by Shel Silverstein was published in 1974.
    Students are introduced to a Silverstein verse and asked for their impressions. They then draw that they imagine when they read one of his lines and then write a line or two to continue the passage.