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1-6 of 6 Results from ReadWriteThink

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  1. Professional Development | Grades   3 – 8  |  Professional Library  |  Journal
    Cold Plums and the Old Men in the Water: Let Children Read and Write "Great" Poetry
    The author of this article advocates using "great" poetry with children, and providing the link between the reading and writing of poetry.
  2. Professional Development | Grades   6 – 12  |  Professional Library  |  Book
    Getting the Knack: 20 Poetry Writing Exercises
    Dunning and Stafford, both widely known poets and educators, offer this delightful manual of exercises for beginning poets.
  3. Classroom Resources | Grades   5 – 12  |  Calendar Activity  |  November 28
    Poet William Blake was born in 1757.
    As a class, students brainstorm abstract concepts and personify that concept through a drawing or story told about the character who personifies that concept.
  4. Classroom Resources | Grades   6 – 8  |  Lesson Plan  |  Standard Lesson
    Polishing Preposition Skills through Poetry and Publication
    Students deepen and refine their understanding of prepositions by reading Ruth Heller's Behind the Mask. They write preposition poetry and create a study guide using an online tool.
  5. Classroom Resources | Grades   3 – 12  |  Calendar Activity  |  November 11
    Veterans Day is celebrated in the United States today.
    Students write biographical poems about a soldier.
  6. Classroom Resources | Grades   1 – 12  |  Calendar Activity  |  November 20
    Where the Sidewalk Ends by Shel Silverstein was published in 1974.
    Students are introduced to a Silverstein verse and asked for their impressions. They then draw that they imagine when they read one of his lines and then write a line or two to continue the passage.