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  1. Classroom Resources | Grades   3 – 5  |  Lesson Plan  |  Standard Lesson
    Book Report Alternative: Writing Resumes for Characters in Historical Fiction
    Students write resumes for historical fiction characters. They first explore help wanted ads to see what employers want, and then draft resumes for the characters they've chosen.
  2. Classroom Resources | Grades   3 – 5  |  Lesson Plan  |  Standard Lesson
    Bridging Literature and Mathematics by Visualizing Mathematical Concepts
    During interactive read-aloud sessions, students identify how an author conveys mathematical information about animals' sizes and abilities. They then conduct research projects focusing on the same mathematical concepts.
  3. Classroom Resources | Grades   3 – 5  |  Lesson Plan  |  Standard Lesson
    Multimedia Responses to Content Area Topics Using Fact-"Faction"-Fiction
    Students climb into the mind of a spider in this lesson that asks them to compose a spider diary using spider facts, fiction, and "faction"—fiction that sounds like fact.
  4. Classroom Resources | Grades   3 – 5  |  Lesson Plan  |  Standard Lesson
    Unwinding A Circular Plot: Prediction Strategies in Reading and Writing
    Students use graphic organizers to explore plot in circular stories while focusing on prediction and sequencing. After exploring the features of circular plot stories, students write their own stories.
  5. Classroom Resources | Grades   3 – 5  |  Lesson Plan  |  Standard Lesson
    What If We Changed the Book? Problem-Posing with Sixteen Cows
    After reading a piece of math-related children's literature aloud, students pose and solve new problems by asking what-if questions about the events in the story.