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1-6 of 6 Results from ReadWriteThink

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  1. Classroom Resources | Grades   9 – 12  |  Calendar Activity  |  August 5
    Author Amy Tan was born today in 1952
    Students watch an excerpt of an interview with Tan and apply some of her principles to writing a story of their own.
  2. Classroom Resources | Grades   9 – 12  |  Lesson Plan  |  Standard Lesson
    Beyond "What I Did on Vacation": Exploring the Genre of Travel Writing
    After reading and analyzing short examples of travel writing and discussing conventions of the genre, students write their own travel articles.
  3. Classroom Resources | Grades   9 – 12  |  Lesson Plan  |  Unit
    Family Memoir: Getting Acquainted With Generations Before Us
    Creating a memoir of an older family member allows students both to learn more about their own backgrounds and to learn the power of storytellers.
  4. Classroom Resources | Grades   3 – 5  |  Lesson Plan  |  Standard Lesson
    How-To Writing: Motivating Students to Write for a Real Purpose
    It's not easy surviving fourth grade (or third or fifth)! In this lesson, students brainstorm survival tips for future fourth graders and incorporate those tips into an essay.
  5. Classroom Resources | Grades   K – 2  |  Lesson Plan  |  Unit
    Investigating Animals: Using Nonfiction for Inquiry-based Research
    Inspired by their curiosity about animals, students work together to research an animal of their choice and present the information they gather to an authentic audience.
  6. Classroom Resources | Grades   3 – 5  |  Lesson Plan  |  Standard Lesson
    Once They're Hooked, Reel Them In: Writing Good Endings
    It's important to "hook" readers at a story's beginning, but it's equally important to keep them interested. In this lesson, students learn to write effective conclusions to their own stories.